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Tsoelopele investment firms

Umbuso Project CC. Nondlela Jacqueline Ngidi. Thabcon Civil CC. Sbomelyna Women Development. Rivoningo Business Enterprises. Mthetha Construction. David Dinah Trading. Emdeni Construction and Projects. Pro Wesley. Motseng Construction Pty Ltd. PS Mabena and Associates. Charles Building Construction. Bronco Trading Simon Bayikheli Consulting. Rato La Tiisetso Engineering. Midas Touch Holdings Pty Ltd.

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Ntromo Holdings Pty Ltd. Set-Mak Civils. Mvelo Sane Consulting. Maponya Magebe Projects Pty Ltd. Mukwambo Trading Pty Ltd. Engiwave CC. Gobodla Risk Firm Pty Ltd. T Solutions Pty Ltd. Mmangwanya Trading and Projects Pty Ld. Dosy Group. Donlu Consulting. Mokone Trading and Projects. Table Bay Construction Pty Ltd. Bao Bao Projects. Zumani Engineering Holdings. Red Step Investment 28 CC. Gabainewe Traders Pty Ltd. KNM Bokone Trading. Nendilmuphi Pty Ltd. Maungo Consulting Pty Ltd.

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Banyana Dirang Trading Enterprise. Elgoma Industrail Projects. Mcollabo Trading Enterprise. Makubonagale Pty Ltd. Boikhutso Development Pty Ltd. Maziya Gembe Deu Project. Simunye Brothers CC. Dinkwe di Tlhakane. Qopha Solutions. Gaborone Ya Katlego. Hometown Glory Trading Pty Ltd. Richu Trading Enterprise. Gabsane Holding Pty Ltd. Rotlwetsa Pty Ltd.

Kol Events Managements Pty Ltd. Madiala Projects. Reatlegile Support Services. Dudumazi Trading Enterprise CC. Tseboentle Trading Enterprise. Elegant Food. Khalipha Business Solutions Pty Ltd. Bravopro Boitumelo Ba Barolong. Pfukani Ma-Afrika Trading Enterprise. Mokgatle Holdings CC. Mogaphiwa Women In construction. Mercy Kgaugelo Construction. Joselyne Davids and Associates Pty Ltd. Simbulele Construction Project.

Golang Notani. T Mans 17 Pty Ltd. Tinissa Trading Bontle Ke Kabelo Trading Enterprise. Organic Intellectuals Holdings. Madimetsa Tshidi Holdiness. Sabuh Trading CC. Zabest Construction Pty Ltd. Hlubis Archistruc Pty Ltd. Immortal Projects Pty Ltd. Bolokega Tirong Pty Ltd. Akamaboko Trading and Projects CC. KB and Sisters. Wanga Health Safety Services. Yonwaba Production. Growth Edge Construction. Timelphy Trading Projects CC. Temoso Trading and Projects 72 Pty Ltd. Bioremediation uses naturally occurring organisms to break down pollutants such as nitrates into less toxic substances.

It thus creates less waste than more expensive methods such as reverse osmosis, and has also proven to be less labour intensive and more cost effective. Our bioremediation pilot project, initiated in , has proven to be effectual in the treatment of nitrates. Large-scale application of the project is currently being explored to ascertain its viability in treating all contaminated water leaving the mine site. We expect the study to be finalised in the first quarter of , and next steps will be determined based on these findings.

As part of our nitrate management strategy, we continued to conduct leach tests during These tests involve collecting bulk rock samples at intervals across the blasting process. These are then analysed to get a better understanding of the leaching characteristics of the nitrates contained in the samples. We have found the tests invaluable in generating models that inform our interventions to reduce nitrate pollution from blasting.

In , our focus in terms of waste management expanded to include proactively minimising waste as well as responsibly managing its disposal. Waste streams were evaluated at all our sites and opportunities to reduce waste were identified. This ash had previously been classified as hazardous, which meant that it would need to be transported across national borders for proper disposal. Its reclassification meant that we could look for more sustainable methods of disposal.

The ash could be mixed with treated sewage sludge and used in our rehabilitation trials to prevent erosion, and as a potting material in seedling beds. We also looked more broadly for opportunities to reduce waste at our mining sites. One area that we identified for improvement was in the cleaning materials used on sites.

They were reassessed and replacements identified based on the sustainability of their packaging and the biodegradable nature of their contents. This allows us to track water usage patterns and establish a baseline that we can use to plan how to better manage water consumption in these areas.

At our sorting and cutting operation in Antwerp, our employees chose to do away with bottled water in favour of water coolers, reducing plastic and water waste. We continue to strive to reduce the amount of nitrates released from our mining processes, while actively pursuing innovative ways to mitigate their impact. Our blasting practices and procedures continue to be refined in to limit the volume of nitrates released into the environment.

Our bioremediation pilot project has proven to be effective in the treatment of nitrates, and baseline studies continue to be conducted in order to establish effective practices. Though not yet at a stage where upscaling can take place, feasibility studies are being planned and we are tentatively excited about the potential of this innovative approach. In , it was decided to halt fertigation trials, which were proving to be costlier and less efficient than the bioremediation trials.

Extreme weather conditions also hamper fertigation for much of the year, presenting challenges to its eventual upscaling. Our leach tests were ongoing in Bulk rock samples were collected, at intervals across the blasting process, for further analysis. The rock samples are then doused with a fluctuating volume of water over a set period of time, in order for us to understand the leaching characteristics of nitrate contained in these rock samples.

The results of this testing are proving invaluable in providing context for the efficacy of our interventions and have been responsible for the design of models to assist in the limitation of nitrate pollution from blasting. Water Our water footprint studies provide an integrated understanding of our water abstraction and water use. A water footprint can be defined as a measure of freshwater appropriation underlying a certain product, including fresh surface water, groundwater incorporated in the product or lost during the manufacturing of the product.

The water sources included municipal supplies, groundwater, surface water and direct rainfall. The amount of water that finds its way back into the environment through discharge and seepage accounted for 2 m3 3 m3 reported in In , the total water footprint in relation to carats mined and tonnes of ore treated was The stress water footprint of the Group, that is the stress placed on the water system by mining activity consumption, was calculated and water usage at the operations was found to be sustainable.

Carbon We carefully manage our Scope 1 emissions, that is, direct GHG emissions that occur from sources that are owned or controlled by the Group. Scope 2 emissions consist of GHG emissions from the generation of purchased electricity. We focus on reducing these emissions by enhancing efficiencies across our operations. We manage Scope 3 emissions, such as emissions resulting from employee and contractor transportation, that are most material to our organisation. In , the total carbon footprint for the Group was tCO 2 e tCO 2 e , primarily driven by electricity consumption and mobile and stationary fuel combustion.

The ratio of This decrease is directly related to an overall decrease in the carbon footprint. The ratio of 1. Dams are an integral part of mining. They are used to impound waste, store water for mine use, control runoff to prevent flooding of mine facilities, and collect and prevent sediment from running off the mine.

Dams remain key areas of risk; however, as impounded material — be it water or liquid-borne solid waste — can present a hazard to miners and communities if the dam were to fail. Indeed, tailings dam failures in Canada in and Brazil in have shown that risk management at every stage of the lifecycle of a tailings dam must always be top of mind.

The term tailings refers to the collected waste materials produced after the extraction of minerals and metals from mined ore, or, in our case, the extraction of diamonds from the kimberlite ore. It is a substance that consists chiefly of powdered rock and water. The aim of tailings management is to provide safe, stable and economical storage of tailings so as to protect community health and safety, as well as safeguard the surrounding environment. Unlike dams that store water or generate hydroelectric power, tailings dams are not designed and built all at once.

They are gradually raised to meet mine requirements according to the life of mine planning. Once constructed, the intention is for them to remain long term during which time they will dry out and will be revegetated. At our mine sites, we ensure full lifecycle management of our tailings storage facilities that span the conception, investigation, design, construction, operation, decommissioning and closure phases.

Our mine plans are in line with national regulations on waste management and storage in Lesotho and Botswana. The SEMP assessments conducted at our mines help us to keep track of our adherence to this legislation. The dams are built and maintained according to the highest structural and environmental standards.

This is just one of many wall expansion phases that will continue over the years to come to ensure that the highest safety standards are maintained. In addition, the dam is closely monitored via a V-notch weir, which determines the flow rate and is connected to a flow monitoring system. The same monitoring is performed for our inactive TSF. Ghaghoo currently has two TSFs, with a third under construction.

An outsourced consultancy firm conducts external quarterly inspections. Safety is our top priority. We maintain facilities that are safe and adhere to best practice design and management standards because we believe that we hold a duty of care towards our people, our communities and the environment that surrounds our mine.

We, therefore, ensure that the strictest management plans are put in place. It is our priority that complete stability and conformity to the established system are maintained at all times. Water is undoubtedly one of our most valuable and most constrained resources on earth.

Safeguarding water sources is, therefore, a key concern for us at Gem Diamonds, in line with our duty of care. Over the years, a number of methods have been examined. One such method was the construction of an engineered wetland in the Qaqa Valley. The wetland construction commenced in late to test the hypothesis of the capacity of wetlands to treat elevated nitrates effectively. We anticipate that results will improve as the wetland continues to establish itself over a longer period.

The wetland has, however, served as an environmental offset area, having been restored after historical artisanal mining destroyed the area. Environmental offsetting is an intervention that seeks to counterbalance an adverse impact on one location by intervening at another location to deliver an environmental benefit. Other methods of denitrification were subsequently explored.

One such method, similar to the use of the wetland but different in application, is that of fertigation. Fertigation involves the use of wastewater supplied to plants through an irrigation system. Denitrification occurs when soil bacteria use nitrates for their respiration in the place of oxygen in the air. This process occurs most rapidly in warm, wet soils. This denitrification has the positive benefit of lowering the nitrate concentration in the water returned to the system. Trials to determine the effectiveness of this method are ongoing.

One of our more promising denitrification trials is our bioremediation plant. Bioremediation is a strategy that uses naturally occurring organisms to break down pollutants such as nitrates into less toxic substances. Species in the bacterial genus Pseudomonas present high potential for bioremediation. During testing, the team discovered a dominance of Pseudomonas species in the water — this meant that naturally occurring bacteria could be used, rather than introducing an alien species, which may endanger the ecosystem in the long run.

A bioremediation pilot plant was subsequently set up. This method of remediation is especially appealing due to its environmentally friendly nature. Not only does it create less waste than more expensive methods, such as reverse osmosis, but it is also more cost efficient and is not labour intensive. Large-scale application of this project is currently being explored to ascertain its viability in treating contaminated water leaving the mine site.

Mining is a temporary activity, with the life of a mine lasting anywhere between a few years to a few decades. During the time that a mine is in operation, however, it generates environmental impacts that should be remediated to demonstrate responsible stewardship of natural resources. This remediation is a costly undertaking, and once a mine is no longer generating income, it is difficult, if not impossible, to raise the capital required to carry out this activity.

Planning for mine closure is therefore an essential part of mining responsibly and in most cases is required by law. At Gem Diamonds, we pursue best practice in mine closure planning, going far beyond what is required of us by host country legislation as we believe that this forms part of our responsibility to our host countries and the communities that live in proximity to our mines.

Every year we quantify the rehabilitation and restoration costs should there be a sudden and unforeseen closure of a mine. In addition, concurrent rehabilitation is pursued at both our operations to ensure that environmental damage is continuously mitigated and not left to end of life of mine. The mine, which is located in the extreme highlands of Lesotho and experiences extreme weather conditions, faces a unique challenge in that guidance on successful rehabilitation is scarce.

The location of our Ghaghoo mine is also unique and has required a constant focus on learning and development. For both operations, the closure plans are constantly reviewed and updated based on research performed at the mines as well as industry best practice. Mitigating the environmental impact from mining has always been a priority for Gem Diamonds.

Wetlands are lands saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, and with distinct ecosystems. Wetlands provide many valuable services for humans and wildlife. They filter pollutants; reduce flooding and provide habitats for fish, wildlife, and indigenous plants. The Qaga engineered wetland was constructed downstream of the Qaga waste rock dump.

In addition to rehabilitating an area previously mined for alluvial diamonds, it is anticipated that the wetland, perhaps the highest man-made wetland in southern Africa, will improve water quality through natural biological and chemical filtering in the wetland biomass. Since , the wetland has continued to develop naturally, allowing for indigenous vegetation to flourish. Through weekly volume control and water quality monitoring, there has been slow but steady progress with regards to wetland establishment and water quality improvement.

The wetlands are crucial to the sustenance of the ecosystems and biodiversity in the catchment, which provides human beings with sources of livelihoods, sustain livestock and regulate water storage, quality, and flow. These benefits are not only important for the livelihoods of the local communities, but also for the growth of the economy of Lesotho.

One major challenge facing this valuable natural resource, however, is that livestock overgrazing and trampling are affecting the rate of erosion of the wetlands. Overgrazing harms wetlands through soil compaction, removal of vegetation, and stream bank destabilisation.

Wetlands offer some of the best forage for livestock as well as a water source and cover, so livestock tend to spend a disproportionately large time in wetlands. Proper management of wetlands rests on effective rotational grazing that allows the wetlands to rest. The initial stages of this project, therefore, have involved educating local herdsman about sustainable grazing practices, ensuring that areas are grazed evenly, decreasing the risk of erosion.

Following better grazing practices, the groundwater level is expected to increase, allowing the wetland to rehabilitate and sustain itself naturally. Protecting the environment in which we operate is an essential focus for Gem Diamonds. We recognise, however, that environmental impacts do occur. We endeavour to avoid these if at all possible and remediate when negative impacts do occur. It is also important to note that all communities have potable water.

Although water largely remains in a closed loop system, some water emanating from the site as a result of stormwater runoff is affected by nitrate. The study was extensive and the solutions put in place have been far-reaching in combating this problem. An official nitrate task team, which works in collaboration with the Lesotho Government, was also established. The nitrate management project began with a nitrate audit conducted to improve blasting procedures and management, as well as reducing the levels of nitrates produced at the source.

Further studies were then conducted, including an investigation into the feasibility of a fertigation and bioremediation project and leach testing to better understand the scale of the issue. During testing, the team discovered a dominance of Pseudomonas species in the water.

Bioremediation proved viable for the removal of nitrates, sulphates and various other salts. Bioremediation and other management options are currently being explored to assess management options available to the operation. The trip was successful, and the team was able to gather vital information on nitrate management and rehabilitation planning which will be implemented in the year ahead. The unique, underground nature of the Ghaghoo mine presents a number of challenges.

One of the major issues the mine faces is the volume of groundwater discovered during underground tunnelling activities. In early , a study on the responsible management of the groundwater was finalised with several options presented, including the use of evaporation ponds, forced evaporation, constructed wetlands, water treatment for domestic consumption and use, water treatment for agricultural irrigation, game watering and finally, aquifer re-injection.

In determining the feasibility of these options, it was necessary to consider a number of factors such as financial viability, environmental care and sustainability, and efficiency. While water is a scarce commodity, the water obtained from underground is generally not suitable for use without significant treatment, which is extremely costly.

Thus, consumption, either by humans or game, was not a viable solution. Treatment for agricultural irrigation was less extensive and therefore considerably cheaper, however, transporting the treated water would be expensive due to the remote location of the mine. Minimising the environmental damage was also a major factor in our study. While game watering was reviewed as an option, the construction of a watering hole would severely alter the present desert-like environment and could have an effect on wildlife migratory patterns, as well as the natural ecological balance of the area of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in which the mine is located.

Wetland construction has the potential for natural water treatment, yet would again be an alteration of the natural environment. One option investigated was controlled evaporation of the water. However, the significant environmental impacts as well as infrastructural costs resulted in this option being disregarded.

After extensive consideration, aquifer re-injection was deemed to be a viable option. Re-injection of groundwater has several major advantages. First, manipulation of head gradients would allow us to have a measure of control over the hydrological flow, thus helping to manage the water on a long-term basis. And finally, the project presents a financially acceptable option. Operational costs are minimal, and initial infrastructural setup is comparatively feasible.

Furthermore, we believe that aquifer re-injection is the most responsible course of action in an environment that experiences water scarcity. The implementation and operation of the aquifer re-injection pilot project is planned for , with further investigation and monitoring to take place before selecting a long-term management strategy. While mining by its very nature has the potential to impact the environment adversely, careful management can mitigate these effects.

Gem Diamonds has implemented comprehensive environmental management and awareness programmes at its mining operations. Initiatives undertaken at its operations included, among others:. At Gem Diamonds, we aim to restore the land we use as closely as possible to its pre-mining condition. Through ongoing and extensive research and planning, we are constantly improving our understanding of rehabilitation methodologies that will help us attain our goals.

These trials, which are run on four different sites with differing combinations of soils, tailings and vegetation, assist with refining the re habilitation and closure plans to ensure more effective results. The project aims to have the communities sell indigenous plants to local projects and businesses, thereby generating income for the community in a sustainable manner. The mine provided training to community members, which included:. The community is in the process of securing the correct infra structure for the nursery, and the project is well underway.

Gem Diamonds is committed to working closely and in collaboration with our stakeholders. Our project affected communities PACs play a vital role in the sustainability and success of our business, and we are committed to ensuring that our PACs experience real, sustainable benefit from the existence of our operations. As discussed in our social pillar section, Gem Diamonds will, from , enter into a new rolling cycle of five-year CSI plans and commitments.

Our current flagship projects will, however, continue to be supported to ensure sustainability upon handover to communities or completion. Over the years, we have undertaken several initiatives to sustainably assist our PACs, focusing on agricultural advancement, education and infrastructural expansion:. Following the discovery of the ct Lesotho Legend, M5 was allocated to the Lesotho Legend Community Project to benefit communities around the mine.

Following extensive community consultations, and in line with the aim of creating sustainable agricultural and social initiatives, it was determined that the Lesotho Legend Community Project would involve the construction and development of a commercial egg farming co-operative. A feasibility study highlighted that this project's viability and sustainability would initially depend on demand driven by the proposed expansion of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project.

During the process of establishing a viable and sustainable business plan, it was assumed that the anticipated expansion to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project would have proceeded according to the schedule laid out.

However, material delays in its implementation have negatively impacted the available market for the egg farming co-operative and, in turn, the commencement of the Lesotho Legend Community Project. We are currently investigating the optimum operating model taking into account this set back and other related barriers to the sustainability of this project. Despite these challenges, however, we believe that this initiative has the potential to create viable and sustainable socio-economic growth well into the future, meeting community needs and contributing meaningfully to local economic development.

The Mokhotlong dairy farm project created a dairy business providing locally supplied pasteurised and packaged fresh milk as an alternative to milk imported from South Africa. The dairy farm owns 32 cows with a projected output of litres a day. Mentoring, business coaching and education in animal welfare is provided by the local non-governmental Organisation that works with farmers on the ground.

However, largely as a result of the delay in the expansion of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, this longstanding initiative has unfortunately also suffered unexpected setbacks. However, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project delays have impacted the immediate sustainability of this project, in turn delaying the anticipated hand over to the community.

We remain confident that given the resumption in operation of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, the dairy farm will operate sustainably. In the meantime, additional research is being undertaken in this regard while we await certainty around the commencement of the next phase of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project.

The footbridge enables children to get to school safely and provides access to essential services and local infrastructure. Our scholarship programme is ongoing, and during , six local students completed their studies in the fields of Metallurgy Engineering, Mining Engineering, Mineral Resource Management and Emergency Medical Care. The ceremony was an opportunity for scholarship alumni to share their experiences of the opportunities these scholarships have presented in studying and subsequent employment.

Meandering hills and steep mountain passes characterise the valley surrounding the Khubelu river. Nestled in this spectacular environment, the communities in the Mokhotlong district, and more specifically in the Pae-La-ltlhatsoa community, are accustomed to the challenges associated with mountainous living. One such challenge is the seasonal risk posed by the Khubelu river, which rises during heavy rains, separating the community from their neighbours on the opposite bank.

During this time, economic activity ceases, and children cannot attend school until the river recedes. Through engagement with community leaders, we established that a connection between the river banks during flood-time is critical to maintaining economic flow and functioning of community activities. We therefore began construction of a much-needed footbridge. Once completed, the bridge will provide pedestrian access for people and livestock, as well as emergency medical transport across the river.

Local community authorities will be able to continue administration and serve delivery activities, while children can attend school, and trade and commerce can continue uninterrupted. These classrooms will greatly expand the capacity of the school and enable children of different age groups to be taught in separate classes.

Additionally, following a rigorous consultation process, the need was identified for the construction of offices for the local leadership in the community to support effective functioning, and the construction of these offices was completed during the year. Recognising this, many of our social initiatives have taken an agricultural focus — seeking to support the creation of viable and sustainable community income streams.

Based in Mokhotlong, our dairy farming project is an initiative that aims to deliver locally supplied pasteurised and packaged fresh milk as an alternative to the milk imported from South Africa, which constitutes the vast majority of locally consumed dairy products.

Building on the remarkable success of this project to date, Gem Diamonds purchased ten additional cows during in response to the growing demand for fresh milk in the region. With the purchase of the additional cows, we anticipate that this will increase to approximately litres of milk per day. Furthermore, as part of this initiative, we have partnered with the Dairy Farmers Association in Mokhotlong to provide mentoring, business coaching and education in animal welfare, and build on the expertise of the farmers.

Currently, our challenge is keeping up with the demand of the local market. Maintaining the quality of animal feed is also an ongoing difficulty, as well as securing affordable and safe water resources for the project. While sharecropping was initially considered an option to produce feed for animals, this approach proved to be labour intensive, costly and prone to theft. As a result, farmers in the area have been encouraged to plant crops that can be used for animal feed, which can, in turn, be sold to the dairy project.

In , we will hand over the project to the community, following our three-year financial investment to establish the project. Gem Diamonds will continue, however, with mentorship and training as required to ensure the ongoing viability and positive contribution of the project. We understand that the long-term sustainability of our business is dependent on our social licence to operate, which is inextricably linked to our ability to create shared value for our stakeholders.

With this in mind, following the discovery of the Lesotho Legend — a carat Type IIa, D-color diamond and the fifth largest gem-quality diamond ever recovered — the Board determined that a portion of the proceeds from the sale should be set aside for investment into a project that would directly benefit our host community. To ensure that any investment made would meet our criteria of addressing the present needs of our communities while also enabling sustainable value creation beyond the life of the mine, community members were engaged to determine the best way forward.

Following the consultation process, and in line with the agricultural focus of our other social initiatives, it was determined that the project would involve the construction and development of a commercial egg farming co-operative. Investigations are currently underway to determine the optimum operating model for the co-operative to maximise the value derived for the community. As a result of regional growth, as well as an influx of employees working on the next phase of development of the Lesotho Highlands Water Scheme, the demand for locally produced eggs is expected to grow.

Given this, we believe that this project will continue to produce viable socio-economic growth well into the future, meeting community needs and contributing meaningfully to local economic development. These talented individuals depicted below were chosen out of numerous applicants to receive this prestigious scholarship for the entire course of their studies in fields related to mining. The programme has been hugely successful with 43 students supported over 13 years.

I am more than grateful to the mine for the scholarship support. This enables graduates to gain valuable work experience and further their careers. I am learning a lot and I receive all support and guidance needed. We recognise that the potential risk posed by both our tailings storage facilities and raw water dams necessitates a proactive approach to risk management at every stage of the lifecycle of our facilities. Our dams are built and maintained according to the highest structural and environmental standards, using international best practice guidelines to inform our approach.

Dam safety is a standing agenda item at operational HSSE Sub-Committee meetings, Group HSSE Sub-Committee meetings, and Group Board meetings where findings from our stringent safety monitoring processes, including internal and external inspections and audits, are discussed and regularly reviewed. Our tailings storage facilities are not designed and built all at once. They are constructed in accordance with downstream construction methods and expanded to meet mine requirements according to the life of mine planning.

Water levels at our dams are rigorously managed. All facilities have V-notch weirs that determine the flow rates and are connected to flow monitoring systems with safety limits set to trigger alerts if the measured flows are higher or lower than the established limits. Therefore, in the case of a prolonged period of rain or snow, the operation will be able to monitor any increases in water flow through the V-notches and identify possible at-risk scenarios.

All facilities undergo stringent inspections on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, surveying various factors such as water level, beach length and overall structural stability. In addition to in-house monitoring, audits by external consultants are routinely performed. Any identified risks are mitigated and required remedial steps implemented. Quarterly structural-stability inspections are carried out by an independent civil-engineering specialist. To safeguard our host communities, an early-warning system, together with community training and awareness programmes are used to support emergency response readiness in the unlikely event of a failure.

Information gathered was integrated into our plans going forward. With a head office in London and operations across Africa, we are always looking for ways to internalise the links between our operations and to share the unique challenges our PACs face. This year we partnered with Queen Anne's, a school for girls in Reading in the UK, to made a difference for the Kaudwane Primary School, located km north-west of Gaborone in Botswana.

Kaudwane has, for several years, been supported by Gem Diamonds, most recently with the repair and maintenance of classroom infrastructure. Given the economic hardships faced by many Kaudwane learners, the head teacher at Kaudwane identified crucial items which would be most appreciated by the school and the learners. The Queen Anne's students then embarked on a drive to source and donate these items.

Sports kit, stationery, clothing and other items were collected and shipped to Kaudwane, to great enthusiasm from the learners there. In addition to their donations, the Queen Anne's learners also held fund-raising walkathon whereby they walked the distance between the two schools — miles from Reading, UK to Kaudwane, Botswana.

Our projects are aimed at creating self sustaining employment in the rural communities in which we operate. This year the dairy project continued to progress well, with construction of offices, a milking room and a cattle shelter being completed. A herd of 17 cows is currently being milked at an average production rate of litres of milk per day. In October milk also began to be supplied to the nearby Kao Mine. A challenge remains in supplying the local schools' market due to its distance from the dairy farm.

While sharecropping was initially considered as a means of generating feed for the animals, this approach proved to be labour intensive, costly and prone to theft. As a result, farmers in the area have been encouraged to plant fodder and yellow maize for sale to the dairy farm. We look forward to the next phase of the project in The Butha Buthe vegetable project has reached a milestone and is effectively self-sustaining.

The extent of Gem's involvement is the payment of the project manager's salary. We continue to monitor the project, but are encouraged by the level of ownership that has been shown by the community, and by a recent request from our staff to assist the community to build a stall from which they can safely and comfortably sell the vegetables produced by the project.

Employee volunteerism is an important part of our social initiatives. CLAW is a welfare organisation known for their pioneering community-based primary animal healthcare in South Africa. CLAW brings their veterinary services to impoverished communities and vital animal care education to pet owners in Johannesburg's poorest township areas. Furthermore, CLAW distributes food parcels, facilitates a home-based-care programme to teach people how to care for the sick and dying, runs food gardens, supports child-headed households and helps communities access health and hospice care.

During , we supported CLAW through the donation of cash and needed items or infrastructure, as well as the sponsorship of 20 hospital beds for the veterinary clinic. Maria Kloppers provides shelter, physical care, rehabilitation and skills development for children and youths who have been subjected to trauma, abuse, poverty and neglect and parental unemployment.

This is done via residential care, community services and educational programmes. Each year over the festive season Gem Diamonds hosts a party for the children, with food, games and entertainment. Prior to the event each child sends a list of gifts that they need , want , and dream of.

For example, one rugby-mad young boy told us he needed rugby togs, wanted rugby balls and place-kicking cones, and dreamt of going to see his favourite team play a match. We are proud to have been able to assist the children with everything they've asked for in each category, and the young man will attend his first Lions rugby game in The party is a reprieve from what can be a difficult time, and has proved to be an emotional and enjoyable time for the children and Gem staff.

In the future, Gem will evaluate ways in which we might be able to support children after they have left the care of the home. The Minister also highlighted that the centre would serve as a source of inspiration for aspiring and future professionals in the diamond mining industry. We are excited about what the centre can bring to the people of Lesotho as well as the value it adds for tourism in the area.

Water One of our most significant infrastructural projects has been the provision of water to the PACs residing in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, which is a major need due to the arid climate. Ghaghoo provides water to Molapo, Metsiamanong, Mothomelo and Gope. The Gope community receives treated water directly from the mining site, and borehole water is used for animal consumption.

While the borehole water for the Metsiamanong and Mothomelo communities was of high quality, the water in the borehole at Molapo was too salty for human consumption. The community has therefore been provided with an on-site water treatment plant. Ghaghoo has taken responsibility for maintaining the plant and ensuring that water is in constant supply. Kaudwane Ghaghoo adopted the Kaudwane Primary School during Students from the Kaudwane Primary School also attend a mine tour annually at our Ghaghoo mine.

The initiative aims to educate students in the mining industry, which is a part of their classroom curriculum, supplying a first-hand experience of a mining site and the mining process. Lephephe In Botswana, Agriculture is an important subject in the school curriculum. Through the money raised, the school has been able to expand the garden and make improvements, such as reinforcing the bottom of the garden to keep pests out.

In fact, I think they prefer it to their classroom work. Botha-Bothe Our Botha-Bothe vegetable production project was initiated in following a needs analysis and extensive engagement with the community. The objective was to improve the food security and nutrition of these vulnerable communities and to provide families with a sustainable source of income. The project has assisted smallholder farmers in the Botha-Bothe community by providing six greenhouses and assisting in the ploughing and planting of 32 hectares of land in the Botha-Bothe community.

Farmers received comprehensive support, including training and assistance in identifying markets for their products and linkage with market requirements. In this way, farmers have been assisted in moving from subsistence farming to commercial farming. The income generated by the project covers its running costs. In addition, the participating farmers receive support from the project with regard to the farming of their land, which they farm for their own income.

During , the greenhouses and fields continued to yield quality produce. However, severe weather conditions resulted in significant damage to crops and adversely affected the profitability of the project. We will continue to support farmers in the year to come to assist them in recovering from the difficulties faced during the year. Dairy farm In the Mokhotlong district, in the highlands of Lesotho, much of the community is largely dependent on livestock as the major driving force for community livelihood.

Following an in-depth community needs analysis that was undertaken in Mokhotlong and Botha-Bothe, a dairy project was identified as the most sustainable means of contributing positively to the socio-economic development of these communities. Once completed, the project will consist of two components, a farm where cows will be reared and the milk processing plant, both of which are currently under construction. Work on the infrastructure needed to support the project began in In total, 30 Brown Swiss cows will be purchased and reared in Mokhotlong, 15 of which will be purchased in and the remaining 15 to be purchased in Brown Swiss cows were.

The processing of milk will include pasteurisation to increase the shelf life of the milk and thereafter the milk will be packaged. Individual farmers will also have an opportunity to sell milk to the farm, which will result in benefit being distributed to the larger community in Mokhotlong. The farm will also employ eight full-time staff members from the community. A biogas system will be installed as the waste management plan for the farm.

All the waste that will include cow dung, human waste, milking parlour, etc will be treated to produce methane gas that will be used to heat water at the farm. The residue will be used as manure in the fields. The rearing and management of calves will be part of the training involved in this project.

Furthermore, artificial insemination will be performed as part of the project. In this way, calves, which will be highly adaptable to the local conditions, will be sold at reasonable prices to community members, rather than having to import them from South Africa.

We could not have come this far, seeing the project being built from the ground up, without their support. Feeding is the highest operational cost of this project. A cropsharing arrangement has been made with local farmers whereby their land is utilised to plant crops to be used as feed. Farmers then receive a percentage of the crops as payment for the use of their land, supplying further benefit to the community. We believe that this project will produce viable socio-economic growth, meeting community needs and uplifting people for many years to come.

Our overarching aim, therefore, is to invest in their well-being in a manner that serves to nurture sustained social and economic benefit both during and beyond the life of a mine. This entails meeting the needs of the present while sustaining the ability of this generation and future generations to support themselves. This is the focus of the Ghaghoo Community Trust, which includes two trustees from our PACs and serves to implement community projects identified.

Supplying water to local communities is one of the vital initiatives that Ghaghoo undertook in the very early stages of the mine development. Due to the arid climate and desertous terrain, this effort has made a life-saving difference to those assisted. To date, Ghaghoo has provided water to four communities.

Boreholes were sunk in Molapo, Metsiamanong, Mothomelo and Gope. The Gope community receives treated water directly from the mining site and borehole water is used for animal consumption. While the borehole water for the Metsiamanong and Mothomelo communities was of a high quality, the water in the borehole at Molapo was too salty for human consumption.

Meeting the basic health needs of our PACs is also an imperative for our organisation. In line with this, Ghaghoo launched a project whereby health workers travel to residents of the Gope community on a weekly basis, providing health care where needed. In addition to this, a school healthcare programme was initiated. Through the provision of a mobile clinic, our healthcare team will be able to travel to schools that do not benefit from healthcare services due to their remote location.

Assistance will include physicals, audio and visual testing and treatment of day-to-day illnesses. We see education as an investment in a better future for all, allowing individuals to acquire the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values necessary to shape a sustainable future for themselves and society as a whole.

We also sponsored a prize giving at the school to honour and encourage achievement in academic, sporting and cultural fields. With the assistance provided through these interventions, the school has seen a pleasing increase in their pass rates over the last few years. The Trust also supports numerous other schools in our PACs by donating sporting equipment, as well as sponsoring prize giving ceremonies and prizes aimed at motivating students to fulfil their sporting and academic potential.

We also worked with Lephephe Primary School, located on the outer boundary of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, to assist in meeting their needs. A decision was made by the Trust to establish a vegetable garden in the Lephephe Primary School, erecting shade netting and installing irrigation, as well as providing an agricultural specialist to assist the school with successful management of the garden. The project has two main purposes: to educate the school children, who are heavily involved in the gardening and maintenance process, and to provide produce for the school and community, bringing vital nourishment to its pupils, and a source of income through sale of the produce.

Ghaghoo also helped the Lephephe community by assisting with organising and upgrading the landfill site near the community. The infrastructure will provide better waste management as well as bring in a small amount of revenue for the community through recycling projects. During , the Mine Educational Tour initiative continued. The initiative aims to educate students on the mining industry, which is a part of their classroom curriculum, supplying a first-hand experience of a mining site and the mining process.

The project has been a great success and preparations to include more schools going forward have been put in place. To ensure we make a sustainable difference in our PACs, we are focused on developing a CSI strategy that will make a difference today while crafting a lasting legacy long after our Ghaghoo mine has extracted its last diamond. In order to achieve this, we have engaged an independent contractor to conduct a comprehensive needs analysis, which will examine the specific needs of our PACs and formulate the most effective way of addressing them.

This will ensure a sustainable relationship between Gem Diamonds and our affected communities for the years to come. The majority of citizens in Lesotho engage in some form of subsistence farming. Farmers rely on their produce for income and to feed their families. Six greenhouses were constructed and 32 hectares of land were ploughed and planted in the Butha-Buthe community. Farmers were assisted in planting produce and were equipped with the skills and tools necessary for maintaining the project.

They were trained in modern farming techniques and hydroponic watering was conducted for all the community farmers. The greenhouses and fields have yielded quality produce throughout the year, although the drought experienced across southern Africa towards the end of presented a major challenge.

The project helps to develop the historical practice of wool and mohair production through the provision of state-of-the-art woolsheds and training. In , we were able to realise the essential aim of the project by allowing it become completely self-sufficient, with community representatives accepting complete management responsibilities. We feel that the project exemplifies a sustainable social investment, and we have been proud to see it succeed in such a great way.

Making basic healthcare available to all is a major need within Lesotho. In order to assist in meeting this need, we initiated a community health workers training initiative. In , we were able to train community health workers, equipping them with the medical kits and the necessary skills to attend to minor health problems. This project was initiated after extensive consultation with our PACs, as well as with the Lesotho Ministry of Health, ensuring that our efforts are directed in the best possible manner to address the real needs of our stakeholders.

The remote location of the mine means that the mine is often the nearest, and best-equipped, medical centre for travellers and community members moving between Butha Buthe and Mokhotlong. Our medical team acknowledges its duty to help out in any situation where they are needed, and they have been able to assist many travellers and locals in need.

This encourages development in areas experiencing a skills shortage and preferential employment and internship opportunities are given to students who have been successful in these fields. This includes the construction of school classrooms, ablution amenities and meeting halls.

In addition to this, a variety of communities have been provided with water production facilities and potable drinking water. Gem Diamonds works in close collaboration with its PACs to ensure that the social projects implemented contribute meaningfully. During , the Trust was registered and started its work.

The Trust serves to implement community projects identified in a collaborative needs assessment process. During , the Ghaghoo mine adopted the Kaudwane Primary School, establishing a long-term partnership. The mine also sponsored a prize giving at the school to honour and encourage achievement in academic, sporting and cultural fields. More projects are planned for , including expansions to the administration block and building additional classrooms.

A decision was taken by the Trust to establish a vegetable garden in the Lephephe Primary School, erecting shade netting and installing irrigation, as well as providing an agricultural specialist to assist the school with successful management of the garden. The produce supplied by the garden is expected to provide community members with vegetables for their personal use and, through a purchase agreement, the mine is able to support the school financially in a sustainable manner.

In addition, the mine aided the Lephephe community by assisting with the management and upgrading the landfill site near the community. Directly or indirectly, water affects all facets of life.

FOREX CHARTS APPS ANDROID MARKET

Leaders have become more engaged as a result of the campaign, and our toolbox talks and other communications are more constructive and directed as a result of the two-way communication that the campaign has instituted. Overall the programme has been met with approval across the Group. The initiatives addressing priority practices are ongoing, and their rollout is envisaged as taking place over the next 18 months, at which time another survey will be conducted to measure whether the intended outcomes have been achieved.

At Gem, we believe that the anticipation and prevention of risks is critical to keep our employees safe. This approach has proven to be successful in our pursuit of zero harm. In , we applied that same ethos to a wider context by including our natural environment in our Group-wide analysis of health and safety risks.

Thus, we began to flag threats to the environment in much the same way as threats to the health and safety of our employees and visitors have been proactively identified in the past. Initially this shift took the form of an awareness programme, to educate employees about the activities of the HSE Department and the types of environmental threats that they should be cognisant of. The response to the programme has been overwhelmingly positive, and has taken an unexpected form: as well as flagging possible risks, employees have been acknowledging positive proactive behaviour where they see it, for example in water-conservation practices.

What has been particularly heartening has been the way in which this acknowledgment of positive behaviours has spread to our approach to health and safety. Positive behaviours have been increasingly rewarded instead of negative behaviours being admonished. The number of proactive HSE reports saw a significant increase over the year, from a monthly average of 60 in the first quarter to a monthly average of in the last quarter.

Another indicator which has increased recently has been our near-miss and nonconformity reporting. This indicates a clear commitment to the proactive approach, and a concern amongst employees for the safety of their peers. Typhoid fever is a serious disease spread by contaminated food and water.

Symptoms of typhoid include lasting high fevers, weakness, stomach pains, headache, and loss of appetite. In , we amended our approach to typhoid management to take into account the fact that the disease can be carried asymptomatically. To address this, we changed our screening procedure to include regular screening and testing of all staff engaged in high-risk areas such as catering. Staff who are identified as carrying the disease are then reassigned to lower-risk areas.

While this new approach resulted in an increase in the number of occupational health cases reported in , predominantly due to an increase in the number of typhoid cases reported, we believe it is the right approach to prevent the spread of the disease.

It should be noted that none of the cases of typhoid reported in reflected cases of symptoms presented on site, and rather this highlights the effectiveness of the preventative screening process. Guarding this intangible value is essential to the long-term financial viability of our business. To support the diamond industry and enhance the premium brand of diamonds, Gem Diamonds was one of the founding members of the Diamond Producers Association DPA , established during The objective of the DPA is to promote the interests of diamond producers and support the development of the sector.

This includes maintaining and enhancing consumer demand for and confidence in diamonds, as well as sharing best practices in health and safety and environmental management with our diamond peers. During , from market research conducted, the DPA realised that younger consumers are looking for a deeper connection — something real and rare in an increasingly disconnected and digitised world.

The research further highlighted how these consumers had shown less interest than previous generations due to the negative publicity diamonds have received over the years. As part of the campaign, the association called on diamond producers to display how they are upholding the rare beauty of diamonds in their value chain. This is a matter that sits close to our hearts at Gem Diamonds as we believe that it is our duty to respect human rights, directly and indirectly, throughout our supply chain.

Our consumers can be assured that our diamonds are not associated with any human rights abuses, and the greatest care has been taken in mining in a way that is environmentally responsible. We believe that this report showcases the value we create, not only for those within our organisation, or the consumers who purchase our diamonds, but for the societies, communities and individuals who reside in the areas in which we operate.

Our people are the heart of our organisation, and as such, their safety is our top priority. We work tirelessly towards our vision of an injury and illness-free workplace where every employee goes home safe and healthy. Over the years, this programme has taken root in the hearts and lives of all those on the mine, and we have seen the fruits extend well beyond the mine.

Wherever possible, the mine seeks to provide medical care to the communities surrounding the mine. The assistance provided to these community members was given without hesitation despite the fact that it placed massive pressure on resources allocated for those working at the operation.

The mine assists, when necessary, those travelling along the A1 road that forms part of the journey to the mine. Maboithatelo had sustained minor injuries, but Lefa was in a critical condition upon arrival at the clinic. While working to stabilise Lefa, the clinic radioed the Lesotho Defence Force to arrange an air evacuation to the Mamohato Memorial Hospital for further treatment. However, the helicopter could not land due to inclement weather. Having received the correct treatment, Lefa made a swift recovery and was out of ICU in two days and was released from the hospital four days later.

Having studied a BSc in chemical technology, Ntsopha has always known that he would study science but was not quite sure in which direction it would lead him. In , having completed his BSc, Ntsopha was offered a bursary by Gem Diamonds to study process engineering. He joined the mine as an intern in , having signed on for a two-year internship. His enthusiasm and commitment, however, was something we recognised early on and he was absorbed into the Company as an environmental officer long before his internship was completed.

He worked as an environmental officer for four years during which time he engaged in several projects, including leach testing, our wetland project and, more recently, our pilot bioremediation plant project, enabling him to pursue his passion for learning and applying knowledge gained in the field. A: It has meant a great deal. I have been allowed to follow my interests and have been given opportunities to apply what I have learnt in a unique setting. A: I am excited about the projects we are doing.

The water projects have been an area of excitement and provided me with an opportunity to do what I love — learn. Our aim is to prevent and mitigate environmental harm to make what we do more sustainable. An example of this is the work we are doing with nitrates. Our findings took us to the source of the nitrates where we worked to find more efficient ways of blasting that would result in fewer nitrates being released into the water system in the first place. We are still exploring ways of improving our blasting processes even further.

We have also focused on remediating the historical damage. All the projects we have pursued in this regard have had sustainability in mind. We have wanted to find solutions that work for the business and nature. We have not at the end of this journey but our drive to do the right thing, the best way, has made us leaders in this field and that is exciting — knowing we can make a difference not only here but beyond this mine.

A: The success we have had with our projects to date has not been without failures and bumps along the way. What we have achieved would not have been possible without the commitment and effort of my colleagues and the support and encouragement of management. Everyone here wants to see the best outcome achieved and is willing to do what it takes, and that makes all the difference.

A: I have been encouraged to pursue my passion. Having expressed an interest in further refining my focus to water management issues, I was given the opportunity to become a line manager in the engineering department where I will be focusing more on water issues. The opportunity for growth has not only encouraged my growth but kept my passion alive.

The nature of the work we do, as well as the remote and extreme conditions associated with our mining operations, means that we operate against many obstacles in the achievement of this goal. This year, we are pleased that these efforts have borne the fruit we desire, with Gem Diamonds reporting an LTI-free Keeping our employees sensitised to the dangers in their environments remains an ongoing challenge. We realise that good health and safety management is not only about the systems and policies that are put in place, but also about how our people feel about safety and health.

The goal, therefore, was to bring about a cultural transformation that required new ways of thinking throughout all levels of the organisation. During , the name of the programme was changed to behaviour-based care BBC as this better reflected the heart of the programme — a desire to care for and protect oneself and other workers on site. The BBC system assists employees to internalise good safety behaviour, identify risks in the workplace, and make appropriate safety-conscious decisions.

The programme has also enhanced a culture of collaboration across the Group. We have seen an increased sense of accountability and involvement. Teamwork has also been a focus in the programme. Employees operate in BBC teams to share responsibility for one another. The BBC teams reinforce team pacts, a continuous commitment to working safely, on a daily basis. As part of the pact formation process, each department identifies and prioritises risk exposure areas.

This initiative aims to involve management in hands-on, on-site safety matters. Line managers carry out weekly visits to various sites. During these visits, management engages with employees at their place of work to discuss the importance of working safely and taking care of one another. These visits also provide an opportunity for workers to express their safety concerns to the management team, helping the Group identify, monitor and manage risks proactively.

The achievements with regards to health and safety at both of our operations, however, speak for themselves. We recognise that the attainment of an LTI-free year is just a stepping-stone. What we want to achieve is a workplace that is completely safe and healthy and that our peers look to as an example of best practice that is challenging norms in the industry. Understanding the risk that our dams could pose to our surrounding communities and receiving environments, dam safety has long been of utmost importance to Gem Diamonds.

In the wake of the tragic events in Brazil, we reiterate our commitment to investing in the safe operations of our dams. The dam walls, for both our waste and fresh water storage facilities, undergo stringent safety procedures in the form of inspections and audits, which are conducted both internally and externally.

The Patiseng TSF undergoes stringent inspections on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, surveying various factors such as water level, beach height and overall structural stability. Quarterly structural stability inspections are carried out by an external civil engineering specialist.

The old TSF is inspected daily, weekly and monthly again with quarterly structural stability inspections supplied by an external consultant. The Mothusi Dam is also inspected on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, with inspection frequencies increasing during higher rainfall periods. Outsourced specialists conduct quarterly inspections for the Mothusi wall. All three dams are closely monitored via V-notch weirs, which determine flow rate and are connected to a flow monitoring system.

Facility risk assessments, resistivity surveys and flow model studies are also regularly carried out to ensure responsible management of the facilities. An early warning system has been established for potentially affected communities with the provision of radio equipment and alarm systems.

Communities have also undergone training and awareness programmes to ensure their emergency readiness. Ghaghoo currently has two slimes dams. Internal inspections on the dams are carried out daily, with structural stability inspections being made on a weekly basis. An outsourced consultancy firm has been appointed for external quarterly inspections.

Ghaghoo staged an emergency drill in June of to assess emergency preparedness plans. The drill was successful, and quarterly drills are being planned for the year ahead. A risk management strategy has been put in place to negate potential threats to the safety of our dams. We believe that ensuring our dam wall safety relies on correct management procedures. Gem Diamonds ensures that the strictest management plans are put in place to ensure complete stability and conformity to the established system.

Addressing the daily risks our employees face is a key priority. BBS is a process that creates safety partnerships between employees, as well as between employees and management. Employees operate in BBS teams to share responsibility across the team. The BBS system assists employees to internalise good safety behaviour, identify risks in the workplace and make appropriate, safety-conscious decisions. We believe that proactive safety management, that is, safety management that looks ahead to improve everyday performance rather than just focusing on preventing what could go wrong, is the natural outworking of our corporate culture of achieving zero harm and promoting responsible care.

We continue to increase our focus on proactive safety management with the purpose of ensuring that our system functions in a way that promotes the health and safety of our people. This determined focus across the Group has resulted in a continued improvement in the number of proactive measures implemented since Proactive measures implemented during the year included, among others:.

At Gem Diamonds, we promote a culture of zero harm and responsible care. A wall failure could not only lead to safety issues, but also to significant financial losses as a result of interruption to production and rehabilitation work that would need to be conducted. In line with our desire to be proactive in safeguarding our people and our assets, the mine has purchased high-resolution pit stability scanners that have been installed around the pit.

These scanners work as early warning systems as they monitor potential large-scale instabilities, as well as local scale movements in the walls on an ongoing basis. Reports generated by the scanners are distributed electronically to the relevant parties and in the event of an issue that must be addressed immediately, warnings are sent via text message and email to enable better response times. We benefit from mining diamonds during the life of our operations, which are situated in or are surrounded by existing communities.

We believe that it is our obligation to contribute to the well-being of our PACs. The mine constructs and equips the facilities, while the Lesotho Government supplies the staff to run them. The facilities assist in the provision of primary healthcare to the local residents and relieve pressure on the district hospital. Aside from the normal factors ascribed to working in remote areas and remunerating skilled employees in a globally weak economy, localisation challenges and difficulties experienced in obtaining work permits for expatriates have exacerbated the problem.

While climate change is a global challenge, its impacts have more devasting effects on developing countries such as Lesotho. The exposed, high-altitude environment of the Lesotho Northern Highlands is no stranger to extreme weather events. However, in recent years, both the intensity and frequency of these events have increased. In response to this challenge, Lesotho has formulated a National Climate Change Policy with the vision of "building climate change resilience and low-carbon pathways for a prosperous, sustainable economy and environment.

It has numerous operational and contingency plans and processes in place to address such events. Various initiatives to reduce energy usage and harmful emissions have been implemented on-site see our environmental pillar for more information. The CCAP focuses on two main areas. The CCAP also seeks to explore ways in which the impact of climate change on these vulnerable communities may be mitigated through assistance from the Company's employment, communication, primary healthcare outreach and CSR policies and programmes.

We recognise that mining has the potential to significantly disrupt ecosystems and negatively impact wildlife populations. Collection records for the survey cycle showed the presence of nine mammal species across the mine lease area, including two species listed as near-threatened regionally and globally , namely the Vaal Rhebok and Southern African Vlei Rat.

It is encouraging to note that the persistent presence of large and medium-sized animals such as the Black-backed Jackal and Vaal Rhebok across the three survey periods provides evidence of the efficacy of the conservation actions and management programmes at the mine, whereby the mine lease area provides a form of protection for these animals.

Mining is a temporary activity. However, at Gem Diamonds, we take a long-term view of the land under our management, recognising that adverse impacts must be remediated to demonstrate responsible stewardship of natural resources. Planning for mine closure is, therefore, an essential part of mining responsibly and, in most cases, is required by law. We pursue best practice in mine closure planning, going far beyond what is required of us by host country legislation as we believe that this forms part of our responsibility to our host countries and the communities that live in proximity to our mines.

Revegetation of this area can be challenging due to the remoteness of the mine and its extreme environment. To achieve our rehabilitation aims, various initiatives have been undertaken. The trials have revealed valuable information, including:. The results of some of these trials were presented at SER 19 — the 8th World Congress on Ecological Restoration — held in Cape Town in September in order to share good practice and receive international critique.

At Gem Diamonds, we are acutely aware of our potential impact on the environment, and continuously assess where our mining operations may affect the biodiversity of the region where we operate. During , we began monitoring the activity of the Bearded Vulture and Cape Vulture nests near the mine footprint. From the data collected to date, it appears that the Cape Vulture is faring best, with one colony indicating a three-fold increase in active nests and the roost at one of the nests showing the first signs of breeding activity.

The survey confirmed, however, that the Bearded Vulture is under pressure, and active conservation programmes such as feeding projects should be initiated to increase the number of breeding pairs. Through collaboration with conservation teams, we have drafted a proposal to initiate a trial feeding programme for the Bearded Vultures that is planned for Continued monitoring will continue during this time to assess the impact of our interventions.

At Gem Diamonds, we appreciate the role mining companies can play to make a meaningful impact in the areas where we operate. We also recognise that our business needs to be profitable and sustainable to secure the value we can contribute. During , Gem Diamonds embarked on a Business Transformation BT process aimed at enhancing operational efficiencies, improving performance and controlling costs. Our objectives also included maximising value from the operations and enabling delivery of sustainable returns, while optimising the benefit for communities and minimising our environmental impact.

However, to fully realise the value of BT in our organisation, we needed to measure the impact on our sustainability performance too. While sustainability principles have always been embedded as a strategic pillar in our approach, we more recently recognised the value of measuring the impact of business efficiencies and improved financial performance on our sustainability performance. Gem Diamonds defined six sustainability principles that the organisation considers critical in realising its strategy.

These include:. As part of the BT process, we performed a high-level assessment to establish the continued relevance of these principles. We also created workstreams, focused on mapping the sustainability principles to BT initiatives, to identify impacts beyond the anticipated operational and financial benefits.

In each of the BT initiatives, we were able to identify sustainability impacts that we could measure in addition to operational efficiencies. To date, we have identified 92 initiatives that will yield both operational efficiencies as well as improved environmental performance. We also identified at least 10 BT initiatives that will optimise the benefit to our host communities. For instance, resource efficiency is an example of a BT focus area that reduces the financial cost of mining but also results in environmental and community benefit.

A recent World Health Organization study estimated that 4. A reduction in our carbon footprint through a focus on reducing our resource consumption will, therefore, not only benefit the natural environment, but reduce the levels of air pollution exposure for our communities and employees. This served to reduce fuel consumption due to driver error, lessen service and maintenance requirements on the vehicles; decrease idle and queue time through improved loading and hauling scheduling, and minimise load spillage and wastage while increasing payload size by using greedy boards.

At the same time, systems were implemented to improve road and tyre maintenance. This was achieved through the implementation of an early warning system that would pre-empt power failures associated with extreme weather or grid instability. Generators would then be engaged to ensure that large, power-intensive infrastructure, such as our processing plants, would not shut down and thus require exponential energy input to start up again.

Looking ahead, Gem Diamonds will shift from a focus on business transformation to a continuous improvement mindset to secure the long-term sustainability of our business and, at all times, looking for innovative ways to generate value for all our stakeholders. Water is undeniably one of our most valuable resources on earth.

Bioremediation uses naturally occurring organisms to break down pollutants such as nitrates into less toxic substances. It thus creates less waste than more expensive methods such as reverse osmosis, and has also proven to be less labour intensive and more cost effective. Our bioremediation pilot project, initiated in , has proven to be effectual in the treatment of nitrates. Large-scale application of the project is currently being explored to ascertain its viability in treating all contaminated water leaving the mine site.

We expect the study to be finalised in the first quarter of , and next steps will be determined based on these findings. As part of our nitrate management strategy, we continued to conduct leach tests during These tests involve collecting bulk rock samples at intervals across the blasting process.

These are then analysed to get a better understanding of the leaching characteristics of the nitrates contained in the samples. We have found the tests invaluable in generating models that inform our interventions to reduce nitrate pollution from blasting. In , our focus in terms of waste management expanded to include proactively minimising waste as well as responsibly managing its disposal. Waste streams were evaluated at all our sites and opportunities to reduce waste were identified.

This ash had previously been classified as hazardous, which meant that it would need to be transported across national borders for proper disposal. Its reclassification meant that we could look for more sustainable methods of disposal. The ash could be mixed with treated sewage sludge and used in our rehabilitation trials to prevent erosion, and as a potting material in seedling beds. We also looked more broadly for opportunities to reduce waste at our mining sites. One area that we identified for improvement was in the cleaning materials used on sites.

They were reassessed and replacements identified based on the sustainability of their packaging and the biodegradable nature of their contents. This allows us to track water usage patterns and establish a baseline that we can use to plan how to better manage water consumption in these areas. At our sorting and cutting operation in Antwerp, our employees chose to do away with bottled water in favour of water coolers, reducing plastic and water waste.

We continue to strive to reduce the amount of nitrates released from our mining processes, while actively pursuing innovative ways to mitigate their impact. Our blasting practices and procedures continue to be refined in to limit the volume of nitrates released into the environment. Our bioremediation pilot project has proven to be effective in the treatment of nitrates, and baseline studies continue to be conducted in order to establish effective practices.

Though not yet at a stage where upscaling can take place, feasibility studies are being planned and we are tentatively excited about the potential of this innovative approach. In , it was decided to halt fertigation trials, which were proving to be costlier and less efficient than the bioremediation trials.

Extreme weather conditions also hamper fertigation for much of the year, presenting challenges to its eventual upscaling. Our leach tests were ongoing in Bulk rock samples were collected, at intervals across the blasting process, for further analysis. The rock samples are then doused with a fluctuating volume of water over a set period of time, in order for us to understand the leaching characteristics of nitrate contained in these rock samples. The results of this testing are proving invaluable in providing context for the efficacy of our interventions and have been responsible for the design of models to assist in the limitation of nitrate pollution from blasting.

Water Our water footprint studies provide an integrated understanding of our water abstraction and water use. A water footprint can be defined as a measure of freshwater appropriation underlying a certain product, including fresh surface water, groundwater incorporated in the product or lost during the manufacturing of the product. The water sources included municipal supplies, groundwater, surface water and direct rainfall. The amount of water that finds its way back into the environment through discharge and seepage accounted for 2 m3 3 m3 reported in In , the total water footprint in relation to carats mined and tonnes of ore treated was The stress water footprint of the Group, that is the stress placed on the water system by mining activity consumption, was calculated and water usage at the operations was found to be sustainable.

Carbon We carefully manage our Scope 1 emissions, that is, direct GHG emissions that occur from sources that are owned or controlled by the Group. Scope 2 emissions consist of GHG emissions from the generation of purchased electricity. We focus on reducing these emissions by enhancing efficiencies across our operations. We manage Scope 3 emissions, such as emissions resulting from employee and contractor transportation, that are most material to our organisation.

In , the total carbon footprint for the Group was tCO 2 e tCO 2 e , primarily driven by electricity consumption and mobile and stationary fuel combustion. The ratio of This decrease is directly related to an overall decrease in the carbon footprint. The ratio of 1. Dams are an integral part of mining. They are used to impound waste, store water for mine use, control runoff to prevent flooding of mine facilities, and collect and prevent sediment from running off the mine.

Dams remain key areas of risk; however, as impounded material — be it water or liquid-borne solid waste — can present a hazard to miners and communities if the dam were to fail. Indeed, tailings dam failures in Canada in and Brazil in have shown that risk management at every stage of the lifecycle of a tailings dam must always be top of mind.

The term tailings refers to the collected waste materials produced after the extraction of minerals and metals from mined ore, or, in our case, the extraction of diamonds from the kimberlite ore. It is a substance that consists chiefly of powdered rock and water. The aim of tailings management is to provide safe, stable and economical storage of tailings so as to protect community health and safety, as well as safeguard the surrounding environment. Unlike dams that store water or generate hydroelectric power, tailings dams are not designed and built all at once.

They are gradually raised to meet mine requirements according to the life of mine planning. Once constructed, the intention is for them to remain long term during which time they will dry out and will be revegetated. At our mine sites, we ensure full lifecycle management of our tailings storage facilities that span the conception, investigation, design, construction, operation, decommissioning and closure phases.

Our mine plans are in line with national regulations on waste management and storage in Lesotho and Botswana. The SEMP assessments conducted at our mines help us to keep track of our adherence to this legislation.

The dams are built and maintained according to the highest structural and environmental standards. This is just one of many wall expansion phases that will continue over the years to come to ensure that the highest safety standards are maintained. In addition, the dam is closely monitored via a V-notch weir, which determines the flow rate and is connected to a flow monitoring system. The same monitoring is performed for our inactive TSF.

Ghaghoo currently has two TSFs, with a third under construction. An outsourced consultancy firm conducts external quarterly inspections. Safety is our top priority. We maintain facilities that are safe and adhere to best practice design and management standards because we believe that we hold a duty of care towards our people, our communities and the environment that surrounds our mine. We, therefore, ensure that the strictest management plans are put in place.

It is our priority that complete stability and conformity to the established system are maintained at all times. Water is undoubtedly one of our most valuable and most constrained resources on earth. Safeguarding water sources is, therefore, a key concern for us at Gem Diamonds, in line with our duty of care.

Over the years, a number of methods have been examined. One such method was the construction of an engineered wetland in the Qaqa Valley. The wetland construction commenced in late to test the hypothesis of the capacity of wetlands to treat elevated nitrates effectively. We anticipate that results will improve as the wetland continues to establish itself over a longer period. The wetland has, however, served as an environmental offset area, having been restored after historical artisanal mining destroyed the area.

Environmental offsetting is an intervention that seeks to counterbalance an adverse impact on one location by intervening at another location to deliver an environmental benefit. Other methods of denitrification were subsequently explored. One such method, similar to the use of the wetland but different in application, is that of fertigation.

Fertigation involves the use of wastewater supplied to plants through an irrigation system. Denitrification occurs when soil bacteria use nitrates for their respiration in the place of oxygen in the air. This process occurs most rapidly in warm, wet soils.

This denitrification has the positive benefit of lowering the nitrate concentration in the water returned to the system. Trials to determine the effectiveness of this method are ongoing. One of our more promising denitrification trials is our bioremediation plant.

Bioremediation is a strategy that uses naturally occurring organisms to break down pollutants such as nitrates into less toxic substances. Species in the bacterial genus Pseudomonas present high potential for bioremediation. During testing, the team discovered a dominance of Pseudomonas species in the water — this meant that naturally occurring bacteria could be used, rather than introducing an alien species, which may endanger the ecosystem in the long run.

A bioremediation pilot plant was subsequently set up. This method of remediation is especially appealing due to its environmentally friendly nature. Not only does it create less waste than more expensive methods, such as reverse osmosis, but it is also more cost efficient and is not labour intensive. Large-scale application of this project is currently being explored to ascertain its viability in treating contaminated water leaving the mine site.

Mining is a temporary activity, with the life of a mine lasting anywhere between a few years to a few decades. During the time that a mine is in operation, however, it generates environmental impacts that should be remediated to demonstrate responsible stewardship of natural resources. This remediation is a costly undertaking, and once a mine is no longer generating income, it is difficult, if not impossible, to raise the capital required to carry out this activity.

Planning for mine closure is therefore an essential part of mining responsibly and in most cases is required by law. At Gem Diamonds, we pursue best practice in mine closure planning, going far beyond what is required of us by host country legislation as we believe that this forms part of our responsibility to our host countries and the communities that live in proximity to our mines.

Every year we quantify the rehabilitation and restoration costs should there be a sudden and unforeseen closure of a mine. In addition, concurrent rehabilitation is pursued at both our operations to ensure that environmental damage is continuously mitigated and not left to end of life of mine.

The mine, which is located in the extreme highlands of Lesotho and experiences extreme weather conditions, faces a unique challenge in that guidance on successful rehabilitation is scarce. The location of our Ghaghoo mine is also unique and has required a constant focus on learning and development. For both operations, the closure plans are constantly reviewed and updated based on research performed at the mines as well as industry best practice.

Mitigating the environmental impact from mining has always been a priority for Gem Diamonds. Wetlands are lands saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, and with distinct ecosystems. Wetlands provide many valuable services for humans and wildlife. They filter pollutants; reduce flooding and provide habitats for fish, wildlife, and indigenous plants. The Qaga engineered wetland was constructed downstream of the Qaga waste rock dump.

In addition to rehabilitating an area previously mined for alluvial diamonds, it is anticipated that the wetland, perhaps the highest man-made wetland in southern Africa, will improve water quality through natural biological and chemical filtering in the wetland biomass.

Since , the wetland has continued to develop naturally, allowing for indigenous vegetation to flourish. Through weekly volume control and water quality monitoring, there has been slow but steady progress with regards to wetland establishment and water quality improvement. The wetlands are crucial to the sustenance of the ecosystems and biodiversity in the catchment, which provides human beings with sources of livelihoods, sustain livestock and regulate water storage, quality, and flow.

These benefits are not only important for the livelihoods of the local communities, but also for the growth of the economy of Lesotho. One major challenge facing this valuable natural resource, however, is that livestock overgrazing and trampling are affecting the rate of erosion of the wetlands. Overgrazing harms wetlands through soil compaction, removal of vegetation, and stream bank destabilisation. Wetlands offer some of the best forage for livestock as well as a water source and cover, so livestock tend to spend a disproportionately large time in wetlands.

Proper management of wetlands rests on effective rotational grazing that allows the wetlands to rest. The initial stages of this project, therefore, have involved educating local herdsman about sustainable grazing practices, ensuring that areas are grazed evenly, decreasing the risk of erosion. Following better grazing practices, the groundwater level is expected to increase, allowing the wetland to rehabilitate and sustain itself naturally.

Protecting the environment in which we operate is an essential focus for Gem Diamonds. We recognise, however, that environmental impacts do occur. We endeavour to avoid these if at all possible and remediate when negative impacts do occur.

It is also important to note that all communities have potable water. Although water largely remains in a closed loop system, some water emanating from the site as a result of stormwater runoff is affected by nitrate. The study was extensive and the solutions put in place have been far-reaching in combating this problem. An official nitrate task team, which works in collaboration with the Lesotho Government, was also established. The nitrate management project began with a nitrate audit conducted to improve blasting procedures and management, as well as reducing the levels of nitrates produced at the source.

Further studies were then conducted, including an investigation into the feasibility of a fertigation and bioremediation project and leach testing to better understand the scale of the issue. During testing, the team discovered a dominance of Pseudomonas species in the water. Bioremediation proved viable for the removal of nitrates, sulphates and various other salts. Bioremediation and other management options are currently being explored to assess management options available to the operation.

The trip was successful, and the team was able to gather vital information on nitrate management and rehabilitation planning which will be implemented in the year ahead. The unique, underground nature of the Ghaghoo mine presents a number of challenges. One of the major issues the mine faces is the volume of groundwater discovered during underground tunnelling activities.

In early , a study on the responsible management of the groundwater was finalised with several options presented, including the use of evaporation ponds, forced evaporation, constructed wetlands, water treatment for domestic consumption and use, water treatment for agricultural irrigation, game watering and finally, aquifer re-injection.

In determining the feasibility of these options, it was necessary to consider a number of factors such as financial viability, environmental care and sustainability, and efficiency. While water is a scarce commodity, the water obtained from underground is generally not suitable for use without significant treatment, which is extremely costly.

Thus, consumption, either by humans or game, was not a viable solution. Treatment for agricultural irrigation was less extensive and therefore considerably cheaper, however, transporting the treated water would be expensive due to the remote location of the mine. Minimising the environmental damage was also a major factor in our study.

While game watering was reviewed as an option, the construction of a watering hole would severely alter the present desert-like environment and could have an effect on wildlife migratory patterns, as well as the natural ecological balance of the area of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in which the mine is located. Wetland construction has the potential for natural water treatment, yet would again be an alteration of the natural environment.

One option investigated was controlled evaporation of the water. However, the significant environmental impacts as well as infrastructural costs resulted in this option being disregarded. After extensive consideration, aquifer re-injection was deemed to be a viable option. Re-injection of groundwater has several major advantages. First, manipulation of head gradients would allow us to have a measure of control over the hydrological flow, thus helping to manage the water on a long-term basis.

And finally, the project presents a financially acceptable option. Operational costs are minimal, and initial infrastructural setup is comparatively feasible. Furthermore, we believe that aquifer re-injection is the most responsible course of action in an environment that experiences water scarcity. The implementation and operation of the aquifer re-injection pilot project is planned for , with further investigation and monitoring to take place before selecting a long-term management strategy.

While mining by its very nature has the potential to impact the environment adversely, careful management can mitigate these effects. Gem Diamonds has implemented comprehensive environmental management and awareness programmes at its mining operations. Initiatives undertaken at its operations included, among others:. At Gem Diamonds, we aim to restore the land we use as closely as possible to its pre-mining condition.

Through ongoing and extensive research and planning, we are constantly improving our understanding of rehabilitation methodologies that will help us attain our goals. These trials, which are run on four different sites with differing combinations of soils, tailings and vegetation, assist with refining the re habilitation and closure plans to ensure more effective results. The project aims to have the communities sell indigenous plants to local projects and businesses, thereby generating income for the community in a sustainable manner.

The mine provided training to community members, which included:. The community is in the process of securing the correct infra structure for the nursery, and the project is well underway. Gem Diamonds is committed to working closely and in collaboration with our stakeholders.

Our project affected communities PACs play a vital role in the sustainability and success of our business, and we are committed to ensuring that our PACs experience real, sustainable benefit from the existence of our operations. As discussed in our social pillar section, Gem Diamonds will, from , enter into a new rolling cycle of five-year CSI plans and commitments. Our current flagship projects will, however, continue to be supported to ensure sustainability upon handover to communities or completion.

Over the years, we have undertaken several initiatives to sustainably assist our PACs, focusing on agricultural advancement, education and infrastructural expansion:. Following the discovery of the ct Lesotho Legend, M5 was allocated to the Lesotho Legend Community Project to benefit communities around the mine.

Following extensive community consultations, and in line with the aim of creating sustainable agricultural and social initiatives, it was determined that the Lesotho Legend Community Project would involve the construction and development of a commercial egg farming co-operative. A feasibility study highlighted that this project's viability and sustainability would initially depend on demand driven by the proposed expansion of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. During the process of establishing a viable and sustainable business plan, it was assumed that the anticipated expansion to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project would have proceeded according to the schedule laid out.

However, material delays in its implementation have negatively impacted the available market for the egg farming co-operative and, in turn, the commencement of the Lesotho Legend Community Project. We are currently investigating the optimum operating model taking into account this set back and other related barriers to the sustainability of this project.

Despite these challenges, however, we believe that this initiative has the potential to create viable and sustainable socio-economic growth well into the future, meeting community needs and contributing meaningfully to local economic development. The Mokhotlong dairy farm project created a dairy business providing locally supplied pasteurised and packaged fresh milk as an alternative to milk imported from South Africa.

The dairy farm owns 32 cows with a projected output of litres a day. Mentoring, business coaching and education in animal welfare is provided by the local non-governmental Organisation that works with farmers on the ground. However, largely as a result of the delay in the expansion of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, this longstanding initiative has unfortunately also suffered unexpected setbacks. However, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project delays have impacted the immediate sustainability of this project, in turn delaying the anticipated hand over to the community.

We remain confident that given the resumption in operation of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, the dairy farm will operate sustainably. In the meantime, additional research is being undertaken in this regard while we await certainty around the commencement of the next phase of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project.

The footbridge enables children to get to school safely and provides access to essential services and local infrastructure. Our scholarship programme is ongoing, and during , six local students completed their studies in the fields of Metallurgy Engineering, Mining Engineering, Mineral Resource Management and Emergency Medical Care.

The ceremony was an opportunity for scholarship alumni to share their experiences of the opportunities these scholarships have presented in studying and subsequent employment. Meandering hills and steep mountain passes characterise the valley surrounding the Khubelu river.

Nestled in this spectacular environment, the communities in the Mokhotlong district, and more specifically in the Pae-La-ltlhatsoa community, are accustomed to the challenges associated with mountainous living. One such challenge is the seasonal risk posed by the Khubelu river, which rises during heavy rains, separating the community from their neighbours on the opposite bank. During this time, economic activity ceases, and children cannot attend school until the river recedes.

Through engagement with community leaders, we established that a connection between the river banks during flood-time is critical to maintaining economic flow and functioning of community activities. We therefore began construction of a much-needed footbridge. Once completed, the bridge will provide pedestrian access for people and livestock, as well as emergency medical transport across the river. Local community authorities will be able to continue administration and serve delivery activities, while children can attend school, and trade and commerce can continue uninterrupted.

These classrooms will greatly expand the capacity of the school and enable children of different age groups to be taught in separate classes. Additionally, following a rigorous consultation process, the need was identified for the construction of offices for the local leadership in the community to support effective functioning, and the construction of these offices was completed during the year.

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